Getting a Building Permit

When applying for a building permit with DCRA, as the homeowner in years past I have used the Homeowner’s Center (excellent resource!) or used the Postcard Permit online system. Not so for this next rehabilitation, my biggest to date. Review Cycle Three (3) begins. Fingers crossed this next round leads to a building permit so that work can finally begin! In the interim, the mowing season is upon us and the weeds and grass sure do grow … way too fast.

Value and Style | 420 16th Street SE Unit 203

Check out this UrbanLand Company #ULC blog post which takes a closer look at 1 Bedroom / 1 Bathroom listings in and around Capitol Hill. 420 16th Street Unit 203 has original wood floors, a modern kitchen, W/D, private storage, and even provides the option to purchase one of the building’s only five parking spaces. Haven’t checked out Unit 203 yet?! Fight the cold and do so this week!

Open House | 420 16th Street SE Unit 203

Just blocks to Eastern Market, come home to a beautifully upgraded condo featuring original wood floors, a modern kitchen w/ granite+stainless steel appliances, ample closet space, a W/ D in-unit, and ONLY ONE OF FIVE parking spaces for the entire 30-unit building! Four Twenty Condos offers outdoor space with grills and bike racks. Also, pet-friendly and includes extra storage space.

Upcoming Open Houses | Call 202-827-6855

Saturday, Jan 13 · 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Sunday, Jan 14 · 2:00pm – 4:00pm

Funded Justice Campaign for Anacostia

As many of you know, I’m a resident of Anacostia, a neighborhood that many in Washington, DC continue to associate with crime, poverty, and disrepair. I write this post in the hope that you will support a community effort to hire legal counsel to defend the Historic Preservation of Derelict District Properties Act of 2016 and the promised Class A retail making up an integral part of the Big K Special Merit Project. You can find details here, but I also find it important to share my perspective on why your support is invaluable.

When I first moved to Anacostia, I began a blog to document my home’s renovation. As I wrote in March 2011, “[my home’s] run-down state illustrates exhaustion and neglect, and for too long the ability to find resonance in an area of the District many continue to associate with these same characteristics.”

In the years that have passed, many homes that once stood abandoned are now filled with (human) life. Small businesses, entrepreneurs, and artists have also taken root, fostering a community that is diverse and vibrant. There is an energy within Anacostia that grows with each passing day – an energy rooted in community, creativity, and respect.

New EoTR homeowners

In the years that have passed, I have also witnessed the dark side of local D.C. politics, namely the failed promise of new, quality investments and a better quality of life for those that call my East of the River neighborhood home.

Whereas residents have come together time and time again to plead our case for (1) why we support an affordable housing plan for the District that does not concentrate poverty in any one neighborhood; (2) why we believe it is wrong for historic homes to be held vacant and blighted by the District’s Department of Housing & Community Development (DHCD); and, (3) why we seek to really be a part of the processes and parameters used by the District of Columbia government to decide how best to revitalize our commercial corridor, our voices are ignored.

The lack of transparency in the actions taken (or lack thereof) and the disregard by the District of Columbia’s leadership for Anacostia must stop. This is why, friends, I humbly ask for your support in this effort to raise monies so that we can seek legal counsel to hold our elected officials accountable. Enough is enough.

Anacostia – alongside other East of the River neighborhoods – should not remain a place to be avoided rather than one to proudly call home. The District of Columbia government should play a key role in this effort.

Demolition by Neglect | Holding DC Government Accountable

East of the river, the Anacostia Historic District has experienced years of disinvestment. The neighborhood contains numerous irreplaceable historic buildings that are vacant and suffering from demolition by neglect. Most disturbing are the historic homes held vacant & blighted for years (even decades) by the District’s Department of Housing & Community Development (DHCD).” Read more here: http://www.lenfant.org/revolving-fund-program/projects/2015-properties-in-need.html

for-poster-save-our-housing-791x1024

a School Before, now a Condo

image

Converted in 2004, the Lovejoy Lofts are a converted schoolhouse located near H Street NE. I’m fascinated by historic buildings such as this one being reconfigured for different purposes or – rather than being torn down – being incorporated into additions and conversions.

Walking through the building’s hallways, I almost expect to see and hear kids and lockers and teachers … yet, you open the door to what could be a classroom and are greeted instead by a modern loft. Yeah.

image

image

Oh, yes, and if you’d like to see for yourself, come to:

440 12th Street NE #105
I’m hosting an Open House from 1 to 3pm!

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑